Category Archives: Baking

5 Reasons to Try Making Bread

Bread

One of my attempts from the book ‘Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast’ by Ken Forkish

  1. YOUR HANDS WILL THANK YOU

    Your hands did not evolve so that you could peck away at  a keyboard all day. No, no. Your hands are the conduit of your curiosity and creativity. When you knead a loaf of bread, you’re letting your hands be hands, and they will thank you for that.

  2. YEAST DOES THE HEAVY LIFTING

    Unlike a lot of weekend-warrior projects where you still have to go to [insert name of store here] and buy [insert supplies here] and then go home and [insert action words for project here] to see it through, when you make bread, the yeast does all of that heavy lifting. Like a simple innkeeper, all you have to do is make sure the little yeasties are warm and well fed, and they’ll take care of the rest.

  3. YOUR FLOUR NEEDS TO GO, ANYWAYS

    As everlasting as flour may seem, it still has a shelf life like any other pantry staple. King Arthur Flour advises that the typical shelf life for flour is between 9 and 12 months. Because I eat carbs like it’s my day job, I doubt I’ll ever encounter spoiled flour. But! If you’re the type to let your flour languish, what better reason to go through a pound or two than in the pursuit of fresh bread.

  4. LESS EXPENSIVE THAN MOST DIY PROJECTS ON PINTEREST

    Do-it-yourself projects tend to follow the rule of three in that a project will typically cost three times as much and take three times as long as originally planned. On the other hand, a 5 lb bag of flour costs $4.95, and a packet of yeast is about $1.00, and that’ll get you a loaf of bread, some pizza dough, and leftovers for french toast the next day. Need I say more?

  5. EVEN IF YOU COMPLETELY SCREW IT UP, IT’S STILL BREAD!

    Even the most fantastic failures in bread making will still be delicious because bread, in and of itself, is delicious. The key is that you don’t name the bread until it’s done! Bread demands that you stay in the present and, quite frankly, nobody needs to know that your delicious dinner rolls began as a rustic hearth bread that didn’t rise.

    Of all of the reasons for giving bread making a try, I think this one reigns supreme. Everyone should experience the pleasure of slicing open a freshly baked loaf that they made with their own two hands, and even if it doesn’t turn out like the picture in the book, it’s still the same flour, salt, water and yeast that have been nourishing our souls for centuries. Unless you’ve burned the dough beyond recognition, you’ll still have something to enjoy at the end of the day.